Posts Tagged ‘volition’

Volitional brain

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Benjamin Libet, Anthony Freeman and Keith Sutherland Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6, Nos 8-9, (1999) http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs In Libet’s experiment the subjects were asked to wait for the urge to make a previously specified wrist movement. This was intended to bring the largest possible element of freewill into the experiment. The subjects should want to act and feel they had control over the action. The article points out that their are many human actions Read more […]

Volition and the readiness potential

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Gilberto Gomes Volition and the Readiness Potential Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6 Nos 8-9, pp. 59-76 http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs Gomes appears to discuss the whole question of free will, from the basic assumption of a deterministic world, qualified by some macroscopic impact from the quantum level. As the latter is random, it is also deemed irrelevant for freewill. He assumes that what he calls the naturalistic view of the physical world means that the mind Read more […]

Volition and the physical law

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Volition and Physical Laws Jean Burns Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6, No. 10, 1999, pp. 27-47 http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs The author starts by pointing out that the presently known physical laws provide only determinism in classical physics and randomness within quantum physics neither of which can be a basis for freewill or volition. Burns suggests that if such a thing as volition does exist it only acts under certain conditions in the brain, and has only a Read more […]

On volition

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David H. Ingvar Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6, Nos 8-9 (1999) pp. 1-10 The article discusses studies of actual and imagined willed acts. These studies suggest that such acts are planned in the frontal and prefrontal cortex as programmes for motor, verbal, cognitive and other acts. Brain scanning shows that prefrontal activity is different for actual and imagined activities. In psychiatric illnesses, reductions in the resting activity of the prefrontal have been recorded. The relationship Read more […]