Posts Tagged ‘orbitofrontal’

Kosiol & Budding on basal ganglia

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Subcortical Structures and Cognition Leonard F. Kosiol and Deborah Ely Budding Springer (2010) This book has some useful angles from the point of view of the role of subjective experience and emotion in brain function. The authors main theme is the underestimated importance for brain function of the subcortical area of the basal ganglia. At times the authors appear to think that their treatise reinforces an automaton model of the brain, against the suspicion of a Cartesian homunculus that Read more […]

Beauty and orbitofrontal

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Sex, beauty and the orbitofrontal Alumit Ishai, University of Zurich International Journal of Psychology, 63, (2007) pp. 181-185 Attention, memory and the emotional system are all modulated by perceiving faces. This activation is distributed across the visual, limbic and prefrontal areas. The extrastriate cortex is involved in identification of individuals; the superior temporal sulcus processes gaze direction and speech-related movements; facial expressions are processed in the insula and Read more […]

Neurobiology of preferences

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The Neurobiology of Preferences Mkael Symmonds & Raymond Dolan, University College London In:- Neuroscience of Preference and Choice – Eds. – Raymond Dolan & Tali Sharot Keywords:  neuroscience of preference/choice, consciousness, orbitofrontal, dopamine P. As far back as the 1960s neuroscience had demonstrated a clear correlation between laboratory rats pressing a lever apparently for pleasure and the electrical stimulation of subcortical dopamine structures. The dopamine system Read more […]

Decision making, determinism and consciousness

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Noise in the brain, decision making, determinism, free will and consciousness Edmund Rolls New Horizons in the Neuroscience of Consciousness – Eds – Elaine Perry, Daniel Collerton, Fiona Le Beau & Heather Ashton In the introduction to his chapter Rolls emphasises that decision making in the brain involves a mix of the reasoning system and the reward system, the latter to a large extent meaning the same thing as our emotional response. Rolls has made an extremely valuable contribution Read more […]

Memory, attention and decision making

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Memory, Attention & Decision-Making (Chapter 3. Reward and punishment-related learning; emotion and motivation) Edmund Rolls, Oxford University Oxford University Press (2008) The author views the orbitofrontal region of the prefrontal cortex as the most important region for determining the value of rewards or punishers. Objects are first represented in the visual, somatosensory and other areas of the cortex without having any aspect of reward value. This only arises in the orbitofrontal Read more […]

Eagleman, the orbitofrontal and Libet

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Incognito David Eagleman This book represents a fairly standard exploration of the unconscious aspects of the mind, but in at least two areas it fails to fully explore its subject in the light of the most recent neuroscience. The function of the orbitofrontal region of the brain is presented here in a quasi-Freudian style, in which some automated process in the orbitofrontal represses urges towards various undesirable behaviour, which emerge as soon as the orbitofrontal is compromised.  Read more […]

Decision making in frontal cortex

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Decision making in frontal cortex: From single units to fMRI Steven W. Kennersley & Philippe N. Tobler In:- Neural Basis of Motivational and Cognitive Control The authors discuss the role of three frontal brain regions, the orbitofrontal, the anterior cingulate and the lateral prefrontal. Although not mentioned as such, the work is interesting in relation to the involvement of subjective conscious experience in determining the decision making discussed here, and its apparent relationship Read more […]

Subjectivity and the brain

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Taste-olfactory convergence and the representation of the pleasantness of flavour in the human brain Ivan de Araujo, Edmund T. Rolls et al, University of Oxford European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 18, pp. 2059-2068, 2003 http://blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?0953-816X INTRODUCTION:   This study is of importance in not only demonstrating that subjective assessments of pleasantness correlates to activity in specific parts of the orbitofrontal cortex, but further that these correlations Read more […]

fMRI Insights

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Neural mechanisms underlying reward and punishment learning in the human brain: Insights from fMRI John P. O’Doherty, Trinity College Dublin In:- Neuroscience of Decision Making  –  Eds:- Oshin Vartanian & David Mandel Psychology Press – Taylor & Francis Group INTRODUCTION:  This chapter highlights two aspects of recent neuroscience research that may be important for consciousness studies. These are firstly the correlation of activity in the orbitofrontal to subjective experience Read more […]

The subjective and the orbitofrontal

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Subjective response and the orbitofrontal Representation of painful and pleasant in the human orbitofrontal and cingulate cortex E. T. Rolls et al, University of Oxford Cerebral Cortex, 13 (3) pp. 308-17 (2003) doi.10.1093/cercor/13.3.308 http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/ In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortices respond not to the intensity of inputs, but to their emotional positive/negative qualities or else their reward/punisher Read more […]