Posts Tagged ‘choice’

Neural choices

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The brain is viewed as having two systems for making decisions. The first approach is to value actions according to the rewards they have generated in the past. A second or model-based approach uses more flexible evaluation of new or changing options, or works on generalisation from known

Observer’s choices

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The choices of other people are argued to increase the value of such choices for individuals. The related neural processing is encoded in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and the signals are predictive of conformity with other people’s preferences.

Beauty and orbitofrontal

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Sex, beauty and the orbitofrontal Alumit Ishai, University of Zurich International Journal of Psychology, 63, (2007) pp. 181-185 Attention, memory and the emotional system are all modulated by perceiving faces. This activation is distributed across the visual, limbic and prefrontal areas. The extrastriate cortex is involved in identification of individuals; the superior temporal sulcus processes gaze direction and speech-related movements; facial expressions are processed in the insula and Read more […]

Neurobiology of preferences

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The Neurobiology of Preferences Mkael Symmonds & Raymond Dolan, University College London In:- Neuroscience of Preference and Choice – Eds. – Raymond Dolan & Tali Sharot Keywords:  neuroscience of preference/choice, consciousness, orbitofrontal, dopamine P. As far back as the 1960s neuroscience had demonstrated a clear correlation between laboratory rats pressing a lever apparently for pleasure and the electrical stimulation of subcortical dopamine structures. The dopamine system Read more […]

Hume’s mistake

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David Hodgson Supreme Court of New South Wales Hume’s Mistake Journal of Consciousness Studies Hodgson’s article is interesting for its examination of freewill in respect of particular decisions, even if its eventual proposal for the functioning of freewill seems less convincing. The author points out that the dominant paradigm of the brain, which excludes freewill, is based on classical Newtonian physics, with possibly some allowance for quantum randomness impinging on it. Here he Read more […]

Confabulation and determinism

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The reason I chose that one is … Based on Lars Hall & Petter Johansson New Scientist: 18 April 2009 This is really another in a long line of studies aimed at using the human propensity for confabulation to create an argument against the existence in freewill. This is not as clearly spelt out as usual in this article, but the refrain here about ‘driving a wedge between intentionality and actions’ is moving in the same direction. It does not require academic studies to tell us that confabulation Read more […]