Archive for the ‘Quantum Biology’ Category

Quantum criticality

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This article discusses the earlier Arxiv paper, Quantum Criticality at the Origins of Life, authored by Gabor Vattay, Stuart Kauffman et al. Electrical conduction is normally associated with the movement of electrons through conductive materials such as metals. However, this type of conduction is not seen as normal for organic systems. Hole and electron transport mechanisms have problems with the size of band gaps.

Mechanisms of anaesthesia

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General anaesthetic photolabels are used to find the molecular binding sites of anaesthetics, such as GABA receptors, protein kinase and tubulin. Involvement of anaesthetics with voltage-dependent channels for negative ions and the mitochondria has been demonstrated by photolabelling. At clinical concentrations anaesthetics can effect the functioning of proteins. Photolabels can attach to residues or individual molecules lining protein pockets, and thus indicate the presence of a dynamic ligand in a pocket.

Anaesthetics and brain energy

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Brain regions where there is an increase in functional energetic demand have a corresponding increase in glucose metabolism, their metabolic rate for oxygen and their cerebral blood flow. Cerebral energy is seen as depending on the oxidation of glucose. Cerebral blood flow similarly tracks energy consumption.

Energy and consciousness

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The authors argue that the conscious state is supported by a high and fairly uniform baseline energy consumption and related levels of neural activity. This viewed is based on PET scanning measures of glucose and oxygen consumption, taken with subjects under anaesthesia, that showed that energy levels while under anaesthesia are 40-50% below awake resting levels across different brain regions.

Anaesthetics & consciousness 2

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Halothane binding proteome in human brain cortex  ::  Roderic Eckenhoff, Maryellen Eckenhoff et al, University of Pennsylvania  ::  Journal of Proteome Research, 2007, 6, pp. 582-592  ::  http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/pr060311u Summary and review of the above paper This later study demonstrated that anaesthetics could interact with many human brain proteins; previous studies has been confined to rodent brains. Recent research has expanded rather than contracted the potential targets Read more […]

Anaesthetics and mitochondria

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Inhalational anaesthetic-binding proteins in neuronal membrane Jin Xi, Maryellen Eckenhoff, Roderic Eckenhoff et al, University of Pennsylvania & Amersham Biosciences  ::  The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 279, No. 19, May 7 2004, pp. 19628-19633  :: http://www.jbc.org/content/279/19/19628.full.pdf+html Summary and review of the above paper In this study 34 binding sites were identified for the anaesthetic halothane. Within this group, mitochondrial proteins especially those Read more […]

Anaesthetics and consciousness

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Anaesthetics act in quantum channels in brain microtubules to prevent consciousness Travis Craddock, Stuart Hammerof, Jack Tuszynski et al, Nova Southeastern University, University of Alberta  ::  www.benthamscience.com/journal/ Summary and review of the above paper INTRODUCTION:  Recent research into the binding of anaesthetic molecules looks to revive the idea of hydrophobic pockets in the microtubules of neurons as the most suitable binding site for anaesthetic molecules. This could Read more […]

Quantum critical biomolecules

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Quantum criticality at the origin of life  ::  Gabor Vattay, Stuart Kaufmann et al, Eotvos University, University of Calgary and University of Toronto  ::  arXiv:1502.06880v2 [cond-mat.dis-nn] 3 Mar 2015 Summary and review of the above paper Most biomolecules are suggested to be neither conductors nor insulators, but to be at the critical transition point between these states. In this respect, they are seen as being a special type of quantum-critical material. Molecules involved in biochemical Read more […]

Avian navigation

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A wealth of evidence suggests that magnetic compass of migratory birds is light dependent, with the eye involved in the sensing of the compass direction. Experiments with oscillating magnetic fields show that these can disrupt the behaviour of migratory birds. Studies showed that the ratio between singlet and triplet products in cryptochrome protein can be modulated by the Earth’s magnetic field.

Quantum biology

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LIFE on the EDGE Jim Al-Khalili & Johnjoe McFadden, Surrey University (2014) Summary and review of the above book INTRODUCTION: This book is important in trying to bring a serious discussion of quantum biology to a lay audience. The continuing need to bring quantum biology into the mainstream is indicated by the sceptical tone of some of the book’s reviewers and the still sparse start-class article provided on Wikipedia. The main drive of the book is to indicate that quantum coherence Read more […]