Archive for the ‘Physics’ Category

Quantum entanglement

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The argument about entanglement goes back to Einstein. The notorious EPR (Einstein/Podolsky/Rosen) thought experiment of 1935 demonstrated that if quantum mechanics was correct then the determination of the state of one quantum particle could instantaneously and over any distance determine the state of another particle. This was afterwards referred to as entanglement or quantum entanglement.

Fundamental quanta

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Quarks and electrons constitute the fundamental building blocks of matter, but in both cases they can be annihilated into energy as photons, or alternatively energy can create such particles possessed of mass and charge out of the vacuum. This might pose the question as to whether the vacuum, which can be identified with spacetime, is not more truly fundamental than the quanta.

Quantum field theory

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The ability of particles possessing mass and charge to be annihilated, and charge carriers such as photons to be absorbed by such particles could be argued to make it difficult to view quanta as something fundamental.

Consciousness as a meta-phenomenon

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The year is 1954.

Alan Turing, is returning home from work at the University of Manchester where he is using the recently installed Ferranti Mark 1 computer to further his researches on morphogenesis and other matters. This behemoth of a machine with 4,000 valves, 2,500 capacitors, 15,000 resistors, 100,000 soldered joints and 6 miles of wire boasts a huge 5120 bit random access CRT memory, 72kbytes of magnetic drum storage and can carry out over 800 additions every second; but for Turing this is not nearly enough. He dreams of the day when a computer can play chess as well as he can and can even fool us into thinking that it might be conscious. After all, isn’t the human brain just a computer with nerves instead of valves?

Implicate order

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Bohm argued that both relativity and quantum theory meant that any analysis of the physical world into distinct, well-defined parts was no longer relevant. He suggests that the structure of holograms gives an insight into his concept of undivided wholeness.

In his description of holograms, coherent light from a laser passes through a half-silvered mirror, with part of the beam falling onto a photographic plate, while the other part illuminates a particular structure. Light reflected from this structure also reaches the plate where it interferes with the light waves arriving from the half-silvered mirror. When this photographic plate is lit by laser light a wave front is created, which is seen to have a similar form to the light coming off the illuminated structure. This allows an observer to see the whole of the structure in three dimensions. If only a small part of the photographic plate is illuminated, the whole structure is still visible although less sharply defined.

Reality, perception, physics

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Thoughts on Reality An insubstantial pageant The one thing we can be reasonably sure of is that what we see has nothing to do with reality. Physics tells us as much as that; that there are no things and there is no colour green. Visual information is delivered to the retina by photons fluctuating at varying frequencies. The photons are either reflected from or produced by ‘objects’, which can in their turn be understood as quantum particles held together by the charges of the electromagnetic Read more […]

Emotions and elementary forces

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The book, ‘The Science of Consciousness’ (published in June 2015), authored by Eva Deli considers the mind a physical system, and an elementary fermion, which interacts through elementary forces, called emotions. Birds and mammals have complex neural organization, which allows the formation of emotions, the basis of the mind’s homeostatic regulation.

Unification of quantum mechanics

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The book, ‘The Science of Consciousness’ (published in June 2015) is authored by Eva Deli, and proposes a new hypothesis, which is rooted in string theory. The author considers the universe being divided by an information-blocking horizon into macrodimensions, called space, and microdimensions, called time.

Special relativity and causality

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ON SPECIAL RELATIVITY Based on material from Roger Penrose and David Bohm While quantum theory and still more its implications have been censored out of much of popular thought and education, relativity may have had the opposite fate of being popularised as a wow! factor, with possibly a lack of balance as to what is really important about the theory. Mass-energy equivalence It could be argued that mass-energy equivalence is of greater significance than more crowd-stopping ideas such as Read more […]

Spacetime theories

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An understanding of the beginning of the universe requires an integration of general relativity and quantum theory or in other words a theory of quantum gravity. String theory has been the best known attempt at this with quanta described as the vibrations of one dimensional strings. However, alternative theories have emerged in recent years.