Archive for the ‘Neuroscience and motion’ Category

Neural coordination

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Neural Coordination and Human Cognition Catherine Tallon-Baudry In:- Dynamic Coordination in the Brain: From Neurons to Mind – MIT Press Brain imaging in recent years has led to the brain being seen in terms of a large number of functional regions, and this in turn creates a need to explain how the activities of these regions are coordinated. This chapter emphasises the distinction between learned routes in the brain and the coordination that is needed to deal with new perceptions and Read more […]

Not ‘just what it is like’

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Steven Bodovitz In:- Consciousness and the Universe (2009-11) This paper describes an interesting experiment serving to demonstrate the distinction between information processing and conscious/subjective assessment. In an experiment by Lau & Passingham (2006) subjects are shown an image (the target), followed quickly by a second image (the mask). When the second image follows quickly enough, the first image/target is removed from consciousness. In a finding similar to blindsight and other Read more […]

Neuroscience

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    This chapter discusses the role of the anterior cingulate cortex. This brain region can be seen as part of a circuit involving the orbitofrontal, the ventral striatum, the dopamine neurons and finally the dorsolateral prefrontal. From the point of view of subjective consciousness, the orbitofrontal can be seen as injecting a subjective consciousness element into the final selection of extended behaviours by the anterior cingulate, which in turn acts on the executive area of the Read more […]

Volition and the readiness potential

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Gilberto Gomes Volition and the Readiness Potential Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6 Nos 8-9, pp. 59-76 http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs Gomes appears to discuss the whole question of free will, from the basic assumption of a deterministic world, qualified by some macroscopic impact from the quantum level. As the latter is random, it is also deemed irrelevant for freewill. He assumes that what he calls the naturalistic view of the physical world means that the mind Read more […]

Volition and the physical law

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Volition and Physical Laws Jean Burns Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6, No. 10, 1999, pp. 27-47 http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs The author starts by pointing out that the presently known physical laws provide only determinism in classical physics and randomness within quantum physics neither of which can be a basis for freewill or volition. Burns suggests that if such a thing as volition does exist it only acts under certain conditions in the brain, and has only a Read more […]

Volition and new brain circuitry

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A Role for Volition and Attention in the Generation of New Brain CircuitryJeffrey SchwartzUCLA Dept. of Psychiatry Journal of Consciousness Studies, 6, No. 8-9, pp. 115-42http://ingentaconnect.com/journals/browse/imp/jcs This paper argues that the exercise of the conscious will can overcome or reduce the problems of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This disorder leads to repetitive behaviour, for example repeated unnecessary hand washing. The patient is aware that their behaviour Read more […]

The neuroscience of movement

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Susan Pockett University of Auckland, Dept. of Physics In: Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour  –  Eds., Susan Pockett, William Banks & Shaun Gallagher  –  MIT Press, (2006)   –  ISBN:  978-0-262-16237-1 In this article Susan Pockett examines the connection between intentions and bodily movements. She emphasises that the brain has no obvious place for the initiation of action. However, the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, where patients find that they can intend or will a movement, Read more […]

Free choice and the human brain

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Richard Passingham & Hakwan Lau Dept. of Experimental Psychology, Oxford University Dept. of Psychology, Columbia University In: Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour  –  Eds., Susan Pockett, William Banks & Shaun Gallagher  –  MIT Press, (2006)   –  ISBN:  978-0-262-16237-1 The authors draw a distinction between actions that are the result of changes within the subject and actions that are prompted from outside or are specified by external cues. They have studied the brain Read more […]