Archive for December, 2013

Thalamic control of visual attention

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Sabine Kastner, Yuri B. Saalman, & Keith A. Schneider,  Princeton Neuroscience Institute and University of Missouri-Columbia In:- The Neuroscience of Attention  Ed. George R. Mangun Oxford University Press (2012) Summary and review of the above chapter Thalamocortical interaction is argued here to be central to understanding perception and cognition. The chapter focuses on the visual areas of the thalamus, and the ability of attention to select behaviourally relevant visual information Read more […]

The self, consciousness and will

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Response to a debate on Fate, Freedom and Neuroscience at the Institute of Arts and Ideas, London This debate highlighted some of the problems that bedevil modern consciousness studies. One such problem is the tendency to elide the self with consciousness. A more detailed analysis suggests that the self is not the same thing as consciousness, but instead merely a part of the contents of consciousness. The main components of the self are, firstly the necessary distinction between the body and the Read more […]

The Unconscious Mind is Governed by Quantum Logic

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The unconscious mind is governed by quantum logic:  How this understanding may help research into mental disorders Independent view contributed by Melissa Telling Back in 1900 Freud, father of modern psychology, classified mental processes such as dreams: flashes of insight and parapraxis as illogical processes, echoes of the unconscious mind working through everyday consciousness, which  then struggles to make sense of the messages of the ‘illogical’ unconscious mind. Today the seeming incompatibility Read more […]

Involuntary attention

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Joseph B. Hopfinger & Emily B. Parks, University of Carolina In:- The Neuroscience of Attention,  Ed. George R. Mangun Oxford University Press (2012) Summary and review of the above chapter Mechanisms of attention are seen as crucial for the brain to select relevant information. This chapter discusses the type of attention that we are compelled to give rather than the type of attention where we are looking out for particular types of stimuli. This is sometimes described as exogenous Read more […]